Malaysia Psychology Centre

Author Archive

workplace-conflicts.jpg
EVER WANT TO BE A SUPPORTIVE TEAMMATE OR AN EFFECTIVE LISTENER? 
We, International Psychology Centre provides a workshop: Counselling Skills at the Workplace, for you to learn how to be a better teammate and employee. This workshop is experiential and aimed at developing a strong foundation to be an effective therapeutic agent to help team members with various workplace issues. Being a strong therapeutic agents can also help you from achieving significant personal development!
This workshop also provides foundational education in:
  • Therapeutic Listening
  • Empathy to people concern conceptualisation
  • Crisis Management
  • Different evidence based counselling techniques 
  • Developing counselling skills and understanding that support an orientation to wellness and prevention as desired counselling goals
The Primary Learning Modes of the workshop includes self-reflective writing, lecture, case studies, skills practice and small and large groups discussion.
To explore the secrets of being a supportive teammate, we share with you the effective ways to become a great therapeutic agent!

Public Workshop Details:

Date       :21st – 22nd February 2017

Time      : 10am-4pm

Venue    : International Psychology Centre Sdn. Bhd.

Speaker : Dr Edward Chan, Principal Consultant Psychologist

Fee           : RM 1,500 per person. [10% off for early bird_ENDS on 8th  Feb 2017]

For details, please call 03-27277434 or email to info@psychology.com.my or  visit www.psychology.com.my

Regards,

Sammy Sam

Supervised Psychologist

International Psychology Centre®

Being expressive can be very touching, most of us use verbal communication to express our feelings, thought to others. Language development can start from early childhood, even starting from the first year.

It is important for you to be concerned about the language development of your children. Knowing what’s “normal” and what’s not in language development can help you figure out if your child is right on schedule. Here’s some developmental norms may provide clues:

Before 12 months

Toddlers within one year old babbles rhythmically, copy some of the sounds and gestures of caregiver make; they play with making different sounds – for example, ‘aaieee’, ‘booo’, ‘ahh’ at varying pitches and volumes.

From 1 to 2 years

Children at this age begin to imitate and approximate sounds and words modeled by family members, and typically say two words sentences spontaneously. Most toddlers are saying about 20 words by 18 months and 50 or more words by the time they turn 2. By age 2, kids are starting to combine nouns and verbs simple sentences, such as “baby crying” or “Daddy smile”.

From 3 to 4 years

Kids at this age can make sentences length four to five words, they have about 1000 words vocabulary. They can tell what they did on that day, they know last name, name of street, even recall several nursery rhymes.

From 4 to 5 years

They have 1500 words vocabulary, they ask many question like “why” and “who”. As they grow their vocabularies are gaining, they are beginning to master basic sentences structure. They also can identify colors, shapes, and comprehend descriptive concepts (big versus little, for example).

Each child’s language development grows with different pace. At the age of two, about one in five children shows signs of having a language delay. Some of these children will catch up as they get older and some do not.

Your child might have language delay if you see some of the following signs in your children:

By 3 years old:

  • Seldom have eye contact
  • Not trying to communicate with you, particularly when they need help
  • Unable to say about 50 different words
  • has difficulty understanding simple verbal requests

Between 3 to 5 years old:

  • Does not understand prepositions or action words
  • Does not use at least 200 words
  • Does not ask for things by name

Language delay involves impaired comprehension or use of a spoken, written, or other symbol systems.  The disorder may involve: the form of language (phonology, morphology, and syntax), the content of language (semantics) or the function of language in communication (pragmatics). There can be a number of causes of language disorder. The most consistently reported risk factors include a family history of speech and language delay, male sex, premature birth, and low birth weight. It most often co-occur with Autism Spectrum Disorder which is linked with heavy metal toxicity, leaky gut or gut dysbiosis and a signature of genetic mutations.

Assessment

A psychologist will be able to conduct the psychological test such as Phonological Test, Dyslexia Test, Pragmatic Language Test and Cognitive or IQ test to diagnose the specific language and other disorder.

Psychologists also trained in PsychoNutritional medicine and therapy such as Dr. Edward Chan, the principal consultant child psychologist at ChildPsych, Centre for Child Psychology of the International Psychology Centre who was accredited by the Amen clinics led by the world renowned psychiatrist Dr. Daniel Amen, can also conduct mental health lab tests including heavy metal toxicity hair analysis, leaky gut urine test, gut dysbiosis stool test and saliva gene tests after the confirmed language disorder diagnoses.

Intervention

Please seek evaluation if you suspect your child has language delay. According to the American Speech Language Hearing Association (ASHA), 200 studies have found that 70 percent preschool children show improvement after treatment. The treatment include:

  • Individual speech therapy: A psychologist trained in speech therapy such as those at the Child Psychology Centre at the International Psychology Centre will interact with a child by playing and talking, using pictures, books, objects, or ongoing events to stimulate language development. This can help the child to build his vocabulary and improve his grammar.
  • Psychotherapy: If your child has emotional difficulties as a result of language issues, you might want to consider psychotherapy.
  • PsychoNutritional Therapy: If your child has heavy metal toxicity, leaky gut or gut dysbiosis their language delay symptoms will drastically improve once these causes have been treated especially if they get treated before the age of 7 according McCandless, psychiatrist and author of Children with starving Brains; a medical treatment guide to Autistic Spectrum Disorder.

Parents are an extremely important part of their child’s therapy program. There are ways you can help your child’s oral language skills at home:

  • Communicate with your child as much as you can: During infancy, sing and play lots of music. Spend a lot of time to communicate with your child, talk about what you see when you’re driving in the car or at the supermarket.
  • Read to your child. Make reading an interactive experience with discussing the book’s pictures, and let your child make up a new ending or act out the story with puppets. Later, let your child point to recognizable pictures and try to name them. Then move on to nursery rhymes, which have rhythmic appeal.
  • Ensure that you do not have heavy metals toxicity before you conceive by doing a heavy metal toxicity hair test because toxic heavy metal can be passed directly to your fetus.

Whatever your child’s age, recognizing and treating problems early on is the best approach to help with speech and language delays. With proper therapy and time, your child will likely be better able to communicate with you and the rest of the world.

 

This article is contributed by Psychologists and PsychoNutritional Therapists at ChildPsych, Centre for Child Psychology of the International Psychology Centre.

Address: 11-1, Wisma Laxton, Jalan Desa, Taman Desa, 58100 Kuala Lumpur.

Tel: 03-2727 7434

Email: info@psychology.com.my

URL: http://www.psychology.com.my

FB: https://www.facebook.com/psychologyasia

asian-child

Greetings from the International Psychology Centre!

There will be a free preview of 1 hour for the International Certification Course – Child Psychotherapy by ChildPsych™, Centre for Child Psychology which held at International Psychology Centre®, 11-1 Wisma Laxton , Jln Desa, Tmn Desa, 58100 KL on 27th June 2015.

Psychotherapy refers to a variety of techniques and methods used to help children and adolescents who are experiencing difficulties with their emotions or behavior. Although there are different types of psychotherapy, each relies on communications as the basic tool for bringing about change in a person’s feelings and behaviors.

During the class, we will guide you to understand and help those children with Anxiety, Autism, Dyslexia, Depression, Conduct  Disorder and so on.

This course is accredited by Malaysian Association of Psychotherapy (MAP).

For more information on Malaysian Association of Psychotherapy (MAP), please kindly visit the following link: http://malaysianpsychotherapy.net/

International Certification Course – Details:

Date:27th June 2015

Time: 10am-1pm

For details, please call 03-27277434 or email to info@psychology.com.my or  visit www.psychology.com.my

Regards,

Reenusha

Supervised Psychologist

International Psychology Centre®

d1135b233c9148a5911779ad51e15c7d

Greetings from the International Psychology Centre!

There will be a free preview of 1 hour for the International Certification Course – Child Psychological Assessment by ChildPsych™, Centre for Child Psychology which held at International Psychology Centre®, 11-1 Wisma Laxton , Jln Desa, Tmn Desa, 58100 KL on 20th June 2015.

The course will teach the participants how to understand children’s normal and abnormal emotions, behaviors and thinking.Participants will learn how to help children to develop healthily.

This course is accredited by Malaysian Association of Psychotherapy (MAP).

For more information on Malaysian Association of Psychotherapy (MAP), please kindly visit the following link: http://malaysianpsychotherapy.net/

International Certification Course – Details:

Date:20th June 2015

Time: 10am-1pm

For details, please call 03-27277434 or email to info@psychology.com.my or  visit www.psychology.com.my

Regards,

Reenusha

Supervised Psychologist

International Psychology Centre®

Tim, a 12-year old boy was referred to the Malaysia Psychology Centre (www.Psychology.com.my) for counseling by his counselors and psychologist rather than psychiatrist trained to assess any ADHD/autistic/dyslexic and aggressive symptoms for various behavioral and attitudinal problems in school. Tim was an enigma in a sense. At home, he was extremely well behaved and obedient. He would do as he was told and did not display any form of rebellious or deviant behavior. He was all-round ‘good boy’. However, when he was at school, his behavior took a 180 degree swing and he was the menace of the school. He was always bullying the other children, regardless of whether they were younger or older than him and he was always extremely disruptive in the classroom. He would make rude remarks when the teacher was conducting a lesson or he would disturb some of the other more studious students who were paying attention, all just to disrupt the ongoing class. Finally, when the teacher did not know how else to tackle this problem, she reported his behavior to his parents. This caused his parents a great deal of concern as he was such a good boy at home. So, they decided to bring him in to ChildPsych, the Centre of Excellence for Children and Adolescents Psychology at the Malaysia Psychology Centre to receive some form of psychological treatment, possibly in the form of counseling.

Counselors at the Malaysia Psychology Centre (ww.psychology.com.my) first conducted the initial assessment session which was conducted over two separate therapy sessions, the parental interview and the child observation session respectively. The purpose of these sessions was to allow the counselors at the Malaysia Psychology Centre to successfully gather enough information regarding Tim, in order to be able to make the best possible assessment of the problem that Tim was facing. Thus, based on all the information that was successfully gathered in these two sessions, counselors at the ChildPsych, the Centre of Excellence for Children and Adolescents Psychology at the Malaysia Psychology Centre were able to make an assessment of the root cause of the problem that Tim was facing. Based on all the information gathered through these two sessions, it seemed that the root cause of the problem was the fact that Tim did not feel it was safe to express his frustration, dissapointments and anger at home, so he vented it out on his peers and teachers in school , the only place that he felt it was safe to do so. He was afraid that if he were to vent out his emotions at home, his parents would not love him or consider him as their son anymore. Thus, in order to tackle this, the counselors worked on helping Tim rebuild this trust and security in his family, thus allowing him to vent out and express his emotions at home as well in a healthy productive manner. This was achieved through a intensive 12 session therapy program which was also supplemented by a biochemically specific brain nutritional therapy program.

In counseling psychology, as well as other social and behavioral sciences, aggression refers to behavior between members of the same species that is intended to cause humiliation, pain, or harm. Ferguson and Beaver (2009) defined aggressive behavior as “Behavior which is intended to increase the social dominance of the organism relative to the dominance position of other organisms”. Predatory or defensive behavior between members of different species is not normally considered “aggression.” Aggression takes a variety of forms among humans and can be physical, mental, or verbal. Aggression differs from what is commonly called assertiveness, although the terms are often used interchangeably among laypeople, e.g. an aggressive salesperson. There are two broad categories of aggression. These include hostile, affective, or retaliatory aggression and instrumental, predatory, or goal-oriented Both of these can be classified under Relational aggression. Reactive relational aggression (hostile, affective, retaliatory) is used in response to feeling attacked, threatened, or mad. Usually the person who exhibits this type of aggression feels provoked to do so. Instrumental relational aggression (predatory, goal-oriented) is used in order for an individual to get what they want. Empirical research indicates that there is a critical difference between the two, both psychologically and physiologically. There has been some links between those prone to violence and their alcohol use. Those who are prone to violence and use alcohol are more likely to carry out violent acts.

 

By practicing suggestions mentioned above for a few weeks, Tim was able to make a drastic improvement in his behavior. The frequency and severity of his acting out behaviors in school among his teachers and peers severely decreased and he was able to have a progressively more open relationship with his family.

 

For more information, please visit:
Website:
www.psychology.com.my
Facebook:http://www.facebook.com/dredward.chan
Twitter:
http://twitter.com/#!/msiapsychology,http://twitter.com/#!/DrEdwardChan
Blog:
https://malaysiapsychology.wordpress.com/

 

Telephone: 03-27277432

Counseling ADHD/autistic children is one of the most popular services at Malaysia Psychology Centre. Jim, a nine-year old boy, suspected to be an ADHD/autistic child by psychiatrist was referred to the Malaysia Psychology Centre for counseling. Jim was always a quiet boy in his formative years, hardly speaking and he generally avoided social interactions. At family functions, he would always remain quiet and rarely socialized with his family, even those of his similar age group. At home, Jim was the only child and he did not have any brothers and sisters. His parents were always working so he hardly saw them and even when he did, his interactions and communications with them were very brief and formal in a sense. He did not share his problems, his experiences or his hopes, dreams and fears like any other normal child of his age group or any other age group would. He did not feel he could confide in them, it was like as though he could not trust them. So he suppressed his feelings, his fears, his disappointments and he told himself he could deal with it all by himself. Whenever he was upset with them, he would withdraw himself from them and others in general and lock himself up, dwelling in his own thoughts, he would ignore their advice, comments or any sign of attention or affection and shun himself from them almost totally. All of this behavior, caused his mother a great deal of concern, she decided that this could not go on any more and he possibly needed some professional counseling, so she brought him in to ChildPsych, the Centre of Excellence for Children and Adolescent Psychology at the Malaysian Psychology Centre.

 

Child psychologists at the Malaysia Psychology Centre first conducted the initial assessment session in which they had two separate sessions, the parental interview session and the child observation session respectively. These sessions were aimed at gathering as much information in order to be able to make the best possible assessment of Jim’s problem. Thus, based on all the information gathered, child psychologists at the Malaysia Psychology Centre (ww.psychology.com.my) were able to make a sound diagnosis of the root of the problem that Jim was facing. Based on the information gathered in the initial assessment, our child counselors found Jim not to be autistic and not ADHD. It seemed that the root cause Jim’s problem was his inability to successfully express his thoughts and emotions to others around him, particularly his parents. He was always inwardly expressing his anger, frustrations and fears which in turn, caused these negative feelings to cause him even more unnecessary stress which in turn would have had a negative effect on his school work, family life and social life. So, child psychologists at ChildPsych, the Centre of Excellence for Children and Adolescents Psychology at the Malaysia Psychology Centre formulated a psychological behavioral therapy intervention program to specifically address these needs that Jim had. The main aim of the therapy program was to teach Jim ways for him to be able to successfully and constructively verbalize his anger in a positive fashion. He would practice this in the sessions with the child psychologists. His treatment program was also supplemented with comprehensive psychonutritional program which was aimed at being a catalyst to his behavioral and psychological change.

 

Passive–aggressive behavior, a personality trait, is passive, sometimes obstructionistresistance to following through with expectations in interpersonal or occupational situations. It is a personality trait marked by a pervasive pattern of negative attitudes and passive, usually disavowed, resistance in interpersonal or occupational situations. It can manifest itself as learned helplessness, procrastination, stubbornness, resentment, sullenness, or deliberate/repeated failure to accomplish requested tasks for which one is (often explicitly) responsible. Passive-aggressive behavior may present itself in many shapes and forms. Some of the common symptoms of passive-aggressive behavior include ambiguityor speaking cryptically as a means of creating a feeling of insecurity in others or of disguising one’s own insecurities, intentional inefficiency, examples of this include chronically being late and forgetting things, another way to exert control or to punish and convenient forgetfullness which is often used to win any argument with denial. Some commoon causes of this passive-aggressive behavior may stem from specific childhood stimulus , such as alcohol or drug addicted parents, in an environment where it was not safe to express frustrations or anger. Families in which the honest expression of feelings is forbidden tend to teach children to repress and deny their feelings and to use other channels to express their frustration. Children who sugarcoat their hostility may fail to ever grow beyond such behavior. Never developing better coping strategies or skills for self-expression, they can become adults who, beneath a seductive veneer, harbor vindictive intent.

 

By practicing sugggestions mentioned above for a few weeks, Jim was able to make a tremndous improvement in his behavior. He was now able to slowly but surely find and practice alternative methods of expressing the frustrations and anger that he felt through more positive methods such as being more assertive in her communication.

 

For more information, please visit:
Website: http://www.psychology.com.my
Facebook:http://www.facebook.com/dredward.chan
Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/msiapsychology,http://twitter.com/#!/DrEdwardChan
Blog: https://malaysiapsychology.wordpress.com/

 

Telephone: 03-27277432

Sean, a seven-year-old boy who was referred by a psychiatrist whose parents have been divorced since he was a very young boy came in for counselling at the Malaysia Psychology Centre (www.psychology.com.my). Over the years, Sean became increasingly angry and rebellious with his mother after the departure of his father from the family. He began to display various forms of rebellious and defiant behaviour. He regularly lost his temper with not only his mother, but also with other people, he refused to listen to his mother, and provoked his sisters. He also became much more defiant and narcissistic and demanded that his mother buy him new toys several times weekly. All this display of rebellious and defiant behaviour worried his mother a great deal and she felt that he might be in need of some form of counselling or therapy. So, she brought him in to ChildPsych®, The Centre of Excellence for Child and Adolescents Psychology at the Malaysian Psychological Centre® in Kuala Lumpur to get psychotherapy and counselling.

Counselors at Malaysia Psychology Centre® (www.psychology.com.my) suggested that Sean’s display of angry and rebellious behavior could be his own unique way of expressing his anger and frustration over the divorce of his parents. The divorce has clearly had an adverse effect on Sean and he has chosen to express the negative emotions built up through displays of angry and rebellious behavior. Therefore, counselors at ChildPsych, The Centre of Excellence for Children and Adolescents Psychology at the Malaysia Psychology Centre worked with Sean to confront and tackle these issues head on. Counselors at the Malaysian Psychology Centre helped Sean work through his issues by assisting him in identifying the root cause of his frustration and anger. They found that the underlying cause of his anger and frustration was his frustration over feeling like he was ignored by his parents. So, in order to help him overcome these feelings of being ignored by his mother and father alike, child psychologists at the Malaysia Psychology Centre (www.psychology.com.my) worked with Sean . After 6 sessions of Emotional Centred processing therapy, he was able to process these difficult feelings . Through a number of emotional expressive therapy including journalling and drawing out his feelings.

Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is a diagnosis described by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) as an ongoing pattern of disobedient, hostile and defiant behavior toward authority figures which goes beyond the bounds of normal childhood behaviour. There are many cause of oppositional defiant disorder. Symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder include actively defying or refusing to comply with adults’ requests or rules, angry and resentful of others, argues with adults, blames others for own mistakes, has few or no friends or has lost friends. Children with oppositional defiant disorder tend to experience social and educational problems. If left untreated, about 52% of children with ODD will continue to meet the DSM-IV criteria up to three years later and about half of those 52% will progress into conduct disorder. Common features of Oppositional Defiant Disorder include excessive, often persistent anger, frequent temper tantrums or angry outbursts, and disregard for authority.

By practicing suggestions mentioned above for a few weeks, Sean was able to make some progress in his behavior. The frequency and severity of his angry and rebellious behaviors decreased and he was able to channel his frustrations and anxiety in a more positive fashion.

For more information, please visit:
Website: http://www.psychology.com.my
Facebook:http://www.facebook.com/dredward.chan
Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/msiapsychology,http://twitter.com/#!/DrEdwardChan
Blog: https://malaysiapsychology.wordpress.com/


Twitter

Blog Stats

  • 46,579 hits

Contact Us

Snail Mail us @ 11-1 Wisma Laxton, Jalan Desa, Taman Desa, 58100 Kuala Lumpur.

Visit us online @ www.Psychology.com.my

Email us @ info@psychology.com.my

Fax us @ 03- 7980 6332

Call us @ 03- 27277434

Recent Comments

Calendar

February 2017
M T W T F S S
« Jan    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728  

Your Name & Email here!

MPC @ Plurk